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Savor


Stories of community, culture, & food

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Savor


Stories of community, culture, & food

 
 

EVERY GOOD RECIPE IS A STORY OF SORTS -

a story of place and identity, culture and tradition, of home.

-        -        -

Savor is a collaborative project celebrating the intersection between culture and community through food in west Salt Lake. Beginning with the authors' curiosity about how food justice and cultural factors impact the perception and execution of eating healthfully, a year of research resulted in the collection of fifteen recipes and contributor profiles from participants originating from 12 different countries.

The book is an account of a group of men and women who use their community kitchen not only to create meals, but also relationships. Through these stories the authors portray how food can act as a cultural anchor, an important element of identity, and a platform from which to build community.

The recipes tell fascinating tales of identity; they are the warmly-shared recollections of distant homes left by refugees and displaced persons, recipes modified by adversity and creativity, yet still so resonant with their origins you can taste it. That these stories, so rich with culture, and place, are told from a recognized ‘food desert’, expands their meaning; they now narrate a compelling and durable resistance to a food system that has made cheap, prepared, and placeless calories an increasingly dangerous norm.

The magic of these stories lies not in the individual ingredients, but in the ways the ingredients come together, weaving sensory experiences that evoke the familiar and comfortable or invite a glimpse of the new and exotic.

Order your copy here to read more about this incredibly diverse community and enjoy unique recipes the residents of Glendale shared with us. 100% of the proceeds from book sales support future cooking projects and a community garden at the Glendale Community Learning Center.

 

 

 
 
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The Contributors


The Contributors


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ROSA

MEXICO / CAULIFLOWER CEVICHE

"It's so important to cook at home because you know what you're giving your family."

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HAYTHAM

PALESTINE / FALAFEL

"When you have the whole family sharing food, there is more spirituality in it." 

SARA

SOMALIA / SAMBUSAS 

"In the Somali community, you don't invite - everyone is welcome." 

KABITA

NEPAL / ALOO PARATHA

"You get to know a lot of people through eating. Food makes us together."

 

FRANCISCA

MEXICO / TORTAS DE camarón CON NOPALES 

"In this community, we gather, we do things together, and we learn from each other."

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ELIZABETH 

MEXICO / plátanos  FRITOS CON CREMA Y FRIJOLES

"[Parents] used to drop their kids and go home, now they stay. They recognize that staying at the school, they learn from each other."

VIRGINIA

MEXICO / BANANA CAKE

"Living in the colony was similar to living in the U.S. Although we were Mexican-American, we didn't eat much Mexican food."

YAMAIRA

CUBA / TOSTONES

"Sharing these different taste profiles is a way to show people the "cultura", through food."

YOLANDA

MEXICO / TAMALES OAXAQUEÑOS

"In Mexico, my family grows everything; they don't buy a lot of food."

AILINE

TONGA / LU PULU

"When you're growing your own food, and you share with others, that's Tonga."

MICHELLE & REBECA

USA & BRAZIL / MACARRAO COM MOLHO DE REQUEIJÃO MAIONESE

"Cooking is usually a time when you gather your friends and you talk, you laugh, tell jokes, and have fun."

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LAURA

MEXICO / FIDEO AL HORNO

"We all gather together in this community space. We watch. We listen. We learn from each other."

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MI SUN

THAILAND / PAD THAI NOODLE SOUP

"I cook every day. Thai food. Burmese food. My children are learning to really like it."

SULIELI

TONGA / SAPA SUI

"My oldest son loves to cook. He won't go to sleep until he has real food - Tongan food."

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SANDA

BURMA / FRY NOODLES

"All the people in my country cook. So, I just saw how they did it, how my mother did it, and then I learned."

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The Ingredients


The Ingredients


CILANTRO

Cilantro – the leafy part of the coriander plant – is used widely throughout the world, for both cooking and medicinal purposes. Cultures across Asia, North America, Latin America, North Africa, and West Africa use this soft herb in a variety of meals – from salsas to pho, falafel to flatbread. 

Cilantro is often added toward the end of the cooking process in order to preserve its medicinal properties and to maintain its fresh, pungent flavor. In South Asian cooking, cilantro is eaten raw in dishes like chutney so that its astringent quality is maintained. In North and Latin American cooking, cilantro is also eaten raw in common dishes like salsa and ceviche. 

Cilantro has an antibacterial compound called “dodecenal”, which has been effective in fighting cases of Salmonella1. Due to its mild antiseptic properties, cilantro tastes “soapy” to a small portion of the population.

Cilantro is also known as Chinese parsley or coriander leaf in various parts of the world. 


NOODLES

Almost every culture in the world utilizes some form of noodle in their cooking. The wheat noodle is used dominantly in European and American noodle dishes. Spaghetti, couscous, and orzo are good examples. In parts of Asia and Africa, however, other flours are used instead – mung bean (glass) noodles, sweet potato noodles, tapioca noodles, buckwheat (soba) noodles, and amaranth noodles are just a few examples. 

Noodles can be used as a main dish or on the side. In Asian spring rolls, for example, noodles are wrapped in rice paper with other vegetables. Noodles have also become a popular ingredient in street food all over the world. 

The shape of the noodle lends itself to different spices, sauces, and tastes, which makes it a versatile ingredient in every cultural cuisine. 

The shape of the noodle also plays a part in various celebrations and traditions. The Yi mein egg noodle, for example, is eaten in Chinese cultures during birthday celebrations. Its long, continuous shape symbolizes longevity.


THE BANANA PLANT

The banana family – which includes the plantain – is utilized in a myriad of fruit dishes worldwide, and its appearance in savory applications is seen globally as well. It is considered a staple carbohydrate crop in many cuisines and is often cheaper than other root vegetables. 

In the Caribbean, both green bananas and plantains are considered “ground provisions” and are used as a quality source of starch in a variety of dishes. In both Caribbean and African cuisines, plantains and bananas are used to make a bread-like dish called pone, much like the corn pone eaten in the Southern United States.1 In Puerto Rico and the Dominican Republic, the banana is made into mofungo – fried green plantains that are mashed together with broth, garlic, pork, and seasonings. This dish likely originated from Africa, where indentured servants and slaves cooked a similar dish called Fufu, which uses smashed cassavas rather than plantains. 

The leaves of the banana plant are waterproof, which makes them a valuable cooking tool in many cultures around the world. In New Zealand, the leaves are used for grilling during pit cooking because they are breathable and add a slightly sweet flavor to any dish. The leaves are also used for steaming because they lock in flavor while allowing heat to release.

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The Recipes


The Recipes


CAULIFLOWER CEVICHE

MEXICO

FALAFEL

PALESTINE

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SAMBUSAS

SOMALIA

ALOO PARATHA

NEPAL

TORTAS DE CAMARÓN CON NOPALES 

MEXICO

PLATÁNOS FRITOS CON CREMA Y FRIJOLES  

MEXICO

BANANA CAKE

MEXICO

TOSTONES

CUBA

TAMALES OAXAQUEÑOS 

MEXICO

LU PULU

TONGA

MACARRÃO COM MOLHO DE REQUIJÃO MAIONESE 

BRAZIL

FIDEO AL HORNO

MEXICO

PAD THAI NOODLE SOUP

THAILAND

SAPA SUI

TONGA

FRY NOOLDES

BURMA